Assessment Rubric Tables

Click on the learning outcomes to select those that are relevant for the topics undertaken. Print out a rubric for the chosen outcomes. You might highlight aspects demonstrated by each student, giving you, students and families an understanding of the student’s levels of achievement.

Arts: Arts ideas (Visual arts)
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Uses own ideas, experiences and observations.
  • Experiments with a variety of tools, materials and effects to solve problems and express their ideas.
  • Creates art works under direction, using the elements of art (line colour, texture, shape, space, light, form and value).
  • Uses their own experiences, past and present, real and imagined as stimuli for their own art works.
  • Imitates and replicates the ideas of others, particularly the teacher.
  • Explores their own experiences, feelings and observations and the way they can be expressed through visual arts techniques, media and elements of art such as line, colour, texture, shape, space, light, form and value.
  • Cooperates with others to create 2D art works such as a small mural painting.
  • Uses problem-solving strategies to work individually or cooperate with others.
  • Recognises and uses the elements of art (line, colour, texture, shape, space, light, form and value) and principles of design (balance, unity, contrast, pattern, emphasis, time, proportion, scale, movement and rhythm).
  • Interprets the ideas of others, recognising the sources of ideas and how they can use and develop them.
  • Explores and experiments with a variety of media to find ways of expressing their own and others’ ideas and feelings.
  • Works individually and with others spontaneously and with guidance to plan, refine and produce visual art.
  • Presents their art works individually and collaboratively for specific purposes.
  • Choose and combines elements of art (line, colour, texture, shape, space, light, form and value) and principles of design (balance, unity, contrast, pattern, emphasis, time, proportion, scale, movement and rhythm) to create a variety of art works.
  • Uses appropriate terminology to describe and give reasons for their choices.
  • Engages in visual inquiry to inform their own art works, with an awareness of the interrelationships between art concepts.
  • Acknowledges the source of their ideas and the influences of the artist or style.
  • Explores a range of visual art ideas and experiment with media, technologies, techniques, forms and conventions to find satisfactory solutions to set tasks, with an increasing tendency to work with more abstract concepts.
  • Works individually and in groups to plan, create and restructure art works.
  • Presents their art works for a variety of audiences and purposes, drawing on a range of skills and knowledge to make sure that presentations work smoothly
  • Applies elements of art and principles of design purposefully to create clearly developed art works.
  • Uses a range of relevant visual arts terminology to describe and justify their choices.
  • Interpret art from a range of past and contemporary artists, designers and art movements, recognising the influence of other artists, styles and conventions and integrating these ideas with their own.
  • Art shows an awareness of the complex interrelationship between the elements of art, principles of design and arts conventions, together with an understanding of abstract concepts such as symbolic stylistic references.
  • Explores different visual arts techniques purposefully to convey meaning.
  • Shows initiative and willingness to experiment with technologies and techniques.
  • Initiates and contribute ideas to plan, develop and present art works in an organised and efficient manner.
  • Integrates the elements of art and principles of design, art concepts and materials to structure their own art works, drawing on a range of forms, conventions and styles with detailed knowledge of some.
  • Uses specific visual arts terminology effectively.
  • Interprets the ideas of other artists, places and times, drawing on their research and in-depth knowledge of particular art forms and related contextual knowledge.
  • Researches a wide range of sources to inform their visual arts and to explore the influence of other artists, styles and conventions.
  • Experiments with these to find new ways of communicating ideas.
  • Develops and refines their visual arts independently, working alone or collaboratively.
  • Presents their visual art for a wide variety of purposes, audiences and exhibition spaces, planning for a range of variables and applying processes to modify their presentations.
  • Shows initiative in the ways that they prepare and organise their art works.
Arts Ideas (Media)
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Draws upon imagination in creating and developing ideas for visual and sound presentations.
  • Uses media to retell a story or event.
  • Identifies pictorial symbols and links them to their purpose and meaning.
  • Explores and experiments with images, solving problems about their immediate media needs.
  • Shares their media with others.
  • Uses media forms, media codes and conventions, to create simple narrative sequences that express their own ideas about graffiti.
  • Uses some specific media terminology.
  • Creates a collage of photographs to portray a particular message.
  • Imitates and replicates the ideas of others, particularly the teacher.
  • Explores their past and present experiences, feelings and observations of the world around them and the way in which these can be expressed through media.
  • Follows guided problem-solving strategies to cooperate with others to plan and produce short media works.
  • Presents works for familiar audiences and endeavour to make their media works appealing and purposeful.
  • Recognises and uses media forms, media codes and conventions, to create media works using given frameworks, selecting from a limited range of choices.
  • Uses some specific media terminology.
  • Interprets others’ media ideas, recognising the sources of ideas and how they can use and develop them.
  • Explores and experiments to find ways of expressing their own and others’ ideas and feelings through media production activities.
  • Works individually and with others spontaneously and under direction to plan, refine and produce media.
  • Presents works to particular audiences for specific purposes and understand the reasons for doing so.
  • Chooses and combines media forms, media codes and conventions, drawing on familiar structures of media and specific conventions.
  • Uses appropriate terminology to describe and give reasons for their choices.
  • Interprets a range of their own and others’ media ideas, drawing on their knowledge of contemporary media, drawing on images, architecture, music, poems and novels for inspiration and recognising the sources of their ideas.
  • Experiments with a range of media technologies, techniques, structures and conventions, with an increasing tendency to work with more abstract concepts.
  • Plans, creates and restructures their media works, identifying and using effective group processes to work on given tasks and timelines.
  • Plans, prepares, develops and presents their media works for a variety of audiences and purposes shaped through collaboration with their peers and teacher guidance.
  • Applies media forms, media codes and conventions, narrative and genre purposefully to make informed statements in their work.
  • Initiates media works that express a range of ideas.
  • Uses a range of relevant media-specific terminology to describe and justify their choices.
  • Makes links to the media of past and contemporary times and cultures.
  • Recognise the influence of other artists, styles and conventions, and integrates these ideas with their own.
  • Explores and experiments purposefully with ways of conveying narrative and meaning in order to portray their ideas.
  • Plans, develops and refines their media.
  • Initiates and contributes to ideas for preparing, organising and presenting their media work.
  • Presents media works, identifying how particular options will cater for purpose and audience.
  • Integrates media forms, media codes and conventions, narrative and genre, concepts and materials to structure their own media works.
  • Uses the ideas from known forms, structures and conventions to create new media works that incorporate sophisticated and/or abstract ideas.
  • Uses specific media terminology effectively.
  • Interprets media ideas, drawing on a wide range of past and contemporary practice and contexts.
  • Explores and experiment with codes and conventions through processes of selection, omission and emphasis to demonstrate their understanding of how values and viewpoints can be constructed and to find new ways of communicating their ideas.
  • Plans media presentations for a wide range of purposes and audiences.
  • Presents detailed design proposals, scripts and plans and shows initiative in applying known processes to modify their media for particular audiences.

Arts Ideas (Drama)
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Improvises roles and situations.
  • Uses drama elements such as voice, movement and role in an unstructured, spontaneous way.
  • Through role play, depicts characters.
  • Uses role-play to explore their experiences, feelings and observations of the world around them.
  • Engages with others to develop their drama.
  • Solves problems about their immediate drama needs.
  • Shares their drama with others.
  • Applies performance conventions, such as taking bows.
  • Uses the elements of drama (role, situation, voice, movement, space and time, language and texts, symbol, audience and dramatic tension) to create short improvisations in role, involving single situations under direction.
  • Identifies and uses some specific drama terminology.
  • Interprets the ideas of others through imitation and replication.
  • Explores ways of expressing experiences, feelings and observations of the world around them through drama.
  • Engages with others under direction, to plan, produce and refine short drama works.
  • Performs for familiar audiences.
  • Demonstrates an understanding of the difference between formal and informal performances and an awareness of audience.
  • Follows given directions regarding performance etiquette.
  • Recognises and uses the elements of drama (role, situation, voice, movement, space and time, language and texts, symbol, audience and dramatic tension) to:improvise a range of roles and dramatic action using given frameworks for their ideas, selecting from a limited range of choices.
  • retell a familiar narrative.
  • interpret short scripts written or developed by themselves or others.
  • interpret given roles and dramatic action.
  • find ways of expressing their own and others’ ideas and feelings through drama.
  • Works individually and collaboratively and with guidance to plan refine and produce drama.
  • Presents their drama to particular audiences for given purposes.
  • Focuses their energy in preparation for performances and engages with and responds to an audience.
  • Chooses and combines elements of drama (role, situation, voice, movement, space and time, language and texts, symbol, audience and dramatic tension) to create a range of simple roles, situations and dramatic action.
  • Uses appropriate terminology to describe and give reasons for their choices.
  • Interprets a range of age-appropriate drama texts, scripted or self devised.
  • Experiments with a range of non-linear narrative structures and conventions of time, dramatic action and audience dynamics to find solutions to set tasks, with an increasing tendency to work with more abstract concepts.
  • Plans, rehearses and restructures their drama works, identifying and using effective group processes to work on given tasks and timelines.
  • Present drama for familiar and unfamiliar audiences in performances shaped through collaboration with their peers and teacher guidance.
  • Applies given performance preparation strategies and performance etiquette.
  • Devises a range of roles, situations and dramatic action to create drama that shows evidence of dramatic tension, mood and atmosphere.
  • Chooses and combines ideas, drawing on familiar forms and conventions of drama.
  • Uses a range of relevant drama-specific terminology to describe and justify their choices.
  • Uses information about the drama of different times, places and cultures and an awareness of the interrelationship between the elements of drama and dramatic conventions to interpret drama in performance.
  • Recognises the use of abstract concepts and applies this in their interpretations.
  • Explores and experiments purposefully with ways of conveying narrative and meaning in order to portray their ideas.
  • Plans, rehearses, refines and restructures their drama efficiently, initiating and contributing to ideas in collaboration and acknowledging a range of variables in the process.
  • Presents drama for a variety of audiences and purposes and modifies their performances for varying spaces, conditions and venues.
  • Shows initiative in performance preparation and organisation to ensure that presentations work smoothly and appear authentic.
  • Integrates elements, concepts and materials to structure their own drama, using extended roles/characters and dramatic action, drawing on a range of forms, conventions and styles, with detailed knowledge of some of them.
  • Extends given structures and combines the ideas from known forms, structures, conventions and traditions with their own to create new drama that incorporates sophisticated and/or abstract ideas.
  • Uses specific drama terminology effectively.
  • Interprets drama scripted or devised by themselves or others, drawing on their research, an in-depth understanding of particular forms, experience with text in performance and related contextual knowledge.
  • Researches a wide range of sources to inform their drama.
  • Uses information gained to explore the influence of other artists, styles and conventions and to find new ways of communicating their ideas.
  • Presents their drama for a wide variety of purposes, audiences and performance spaces.
  • Plans for a range of performance variables and shows initiative in applying known processes to modify preparation, organisation and performance in response to particular audiences.

Art: Arts in society
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Recognises graffiti in book illustrations, cards, public art, fabric designs or Web pages.
  • Recognises the ways that graffiti and urban art are similar to and different from other arts forms.
  • Identifies some of the art resources used for graffiti and urban art.
  • Recognises that some people are artists and have jobs in urban art.
  • Recognise some of the different purposes of graffiti.
  • Refers to significant urban artists and art works they know about and suggest reasons for their importance.
  • Recognises and identifies some of the ways that some urban art tells stories and expresses ideas and feelings about Australian culture.
  • Recognises graffiti from other times and places and can offer reasons how or why these are different to graffiti in their community.
  • Identifies some of the resources used in graffiti and urban art.
  • Recognises that people work in the local community creating urban art.
  • Identifies the purposes and functions of urban art in contemporary life.
  • Identifies examples of urban art in Australia and recognise the range of cultures that is represented in the contemporary Australian context.
  • Recognise the art work of some urban artists.
  • Recognises and identifies that urban art works have features that place them in a particular time, art movement or culture.
  • Discusses and compares graffiti and urban art in contemporary and traditional cultures.
  • Identifies the various roles in the production and presentation of urban art works.
  • Recognises the vocational choices that are available.
  • Understands how graffiti and urban art affect the life of people in societies.
  • Recognises ways in which urban art represents human experience.
  • Understands that there are cultural and social factors that affect the ways graffiti vandalism and urban art are valued in society.
  • Identify features of urban art.
  • Identifies, discusses and compares graffiti vandalism and urban art across different cultures, places and times and makes comparisons and connections between them.
  • Identifies stylistic traditions associated with graffiti vandalism and urban art.
  • Compares and identifies the influence of other cultures on graffiti vandalism and urban art.
  • Identifies a range of artistic, management, marketing, curatorial and technical jobs in urban art.
  • Recognises achievements in urban art locally, nationally and internationally.
  • Understands some of the ways that graffiti vandalism and urban art may shape values, reinforcing or challenging ideas.
  • Identifies the ways that the graffiti and urban art of different cultures has influenced the development of graffiti and urban art in Australian.
  • Identifies some ways in which graffiti vandalism and urban art works can change in different viewing contexts.
  • Recognises some of the factors that make urban art more valued than graffiti vandalism in economic terms: for example, the way that some works become ‘collectable’ and others do not.
  • They understand the importance of celebrity and infamy to the graffiti and urban art worlds.
  • Recognises the diversity of Australian urban art, and identifies issues, central themes and significant features of forms and styles.
  • Describes analyses, interprets and evaluates social, historical, political and economic contexts, and generalises about the way that these contexts influence the shaping of graffiti vandalism and urban art.
  • Identifies the resources available for their urban art works.
  • Identifies the creative, collaborative and interdependent roles of individuals in the development and production of urban art.
  • Recognises that the costs of production can be met from a range of sources and includes these considerations in their preparation and planning for their own urban art work.

English: Speaking and listening (Speak and listen to entertain, recount, retell, socialise, explain and/or inquire)
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Recounts personal experiences and conveys key information or ideas.
  • Expresses opinions and listens to the opinions of others.
  • Provides some key ideas and supporting details.
  • Includes brief descriptions and events in logical sequence.
  • Responds to questions, instructions, statements and narratives.
  • Correctly uses expressions of routine social interaction.
  • Shows emerging awareness of school purposes and expectations for using and interpreting spoken language.
  • Understands the purpose of, and their roles in, routine classroom activities involving listening and speaking by using language and behaviours appropriate to a range of familiar classroom situations.
  • Identifies, locates and obtains the main ideas in information.
  • Explains familiar procedures, describes and recounts events in a logical sequence.
  • Listen to others and comments appropriately.
  • Connects information to their own experience.
  • Shows awareness of how speaking is adjusted in different situations.
  • Observes conventions relating to taking turns and interrupting and make some use of non-verbal cues and differences in tone and pace of text delivery.
  • Consider the ways in which listening and speaking behaviours change according to the demands of the situation.
  • Acknowledges situations in which they change such elements as volume, vocabulary and social conventions for different purposes and audiences.
  • Sustains conversation on a familiar topic.
  • Obtains closely-connected or related information from informational and expressive spoken texts.
  • Follows conversation in group discussions.
  • Expresses opinions and perceptions.
  • Participates in problem-solving discussions with peers, where they recognise problems and suggest solutions, express opinions, share ideas and predict outcomes.
  • Gives brief reports and summarises information.
  • Recognises that different spoken texts are used and adapted to meet different educational situations and purposes.
  • Modifies elements such as volume, pace, tone, stress and body language for different purposes and audiences.
  • Identifies the main ideas and explicit supporting details of clearly-structured spoken informational or expressive texts.
  • Identifies alternative viewpoints in spoken, audio and video texts.
  • Develops and presents ideas and information and supports opinions with some detail.
  • Presents a point of view offering considered reasons and arguments.
  • Speaks using devices that engage the audience.
  • Draws conclusions based on evaluation of appropriate details.
  • Offer explanations that show clearly why phenomena occur.
  • Indicates their understanding of the main idea of a spoken text by summarising it for others.
  • Experiments with listening behaviours to achieve various effects.
  • Understands some indicators of socio-cultural bias or prejudice, such as a speaker’s use of discriminatory language.
  • Considers the needs of a familiar audience and demonstrates sensitivity to audience values and expectations.
  • Analyses challenging topics, taking into account ideas from others and giving reasons for their own ideas.
  • Recognises and records the main ideas in complex spoken texts.
  • Compares and contrasts different points of view, identifying supporting evidence for each of them.
  • Takes responsibility for preparing and presenting their own speaking in a range of situations, such as giving talks and explaining aspects of a topic.
  • Evaluates the effectiveness of text form and register in relation to audience, purpose and context when listening and speaking in a range of informal and formal situations.
  • Experiments with vocabulary and phrasing in an attempt to enhance interest and accuracy.
  • Demonstrates awareness of other people’s contexts by employing appropriate questions, allusions, illustrations or examples.
  • Processes ideas and information and identifies different perspectives on complex issues in spoken texts, including sustained and unstructured discourse, in a variety of media and situations.
  • Conveys detailed information and explores different perspectives on complex issues.
  • Identifies ways in which socio-cultural background, knowledge and opinion influence the meanings that listeners and speakers receive and convey.
  • Orients listeners appropriately and acknowledges listeners’ perspectives and contexts.
  • Identifies likely expectations, reactions and characteristics of particular audiences and accommodates or resists these expectations when planning and presenting information.
  • Recognises the ways in which elements of spoken language can be interpreted differently according to context and audience.

English: Speaking and listening (Uses the conventions of speaking and listening)
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Listens attentively, showing interest by using body language and asking questions.
  • Relies on simple sentences or uses simple connectives to link ideas.
  • Interprets and responds to simple statements, instructions, commands, questions and non-verbal cues in ways appropriate to their culture.
  • Speaks audibly on most occasions, pronouncing most sounds from their own variety of English clearly.
  • Sequences ideas in speech in intelligible ways.
  • Attempts to adopt an appropriate tone of voice and intonation to convey meaning.
  • Uses statements, questions and commands to generate and maintain discussions.
  • Understands and experiments with grammatical connectives and language features for interpreting and expressing spoken ideas and information.
  • Uses some of the common school conventions.
  • Recounts events in a logical sequence.
  • Listens attentively, showing interest by using body language, tone and pace of delivery.
  • Comments appropriately on the contributions of others in group discussions.
  • Takes turns in group discussions.
  • Recognises the beginnings and ends of spoken texts and understands common idioms such as ‘that’s great’ or ‘hang on a minute’.
  • Provides supporting details for key ideas using connectives such as ‘if’, ‘then’, ‘and’, and ‘because’.
  • Experiments with different grammatical structures and vocabulary to express ideas.
  • Continues conversations by providing details or repeating ideas.
  • Uses most language structures and features of spoken language appropriately to describe experiences, classify, share and compare information, give explanations, express feelings, draw conclusions and present an argument.
  • Applies listening behaviours appropriate to class and school situations.
  • Understands that audience, purpose and context affect the listening behaviours required.
  • Draws on their knowledge of the language structures and features of spoken texts when interpreting information.
  • Observes the social conventions for speaking, often relying on rehearsed phrases.
  • Uses listening behaviours required in the classroom and at school.
  • Assists and sustains conversation.
  • Recognises and controls most language structures and features of spoken language for expressing and interpreting meaning and developing and presenting ideas and information.
  • Selects and sustains language and style appropriate to a range of purposes, contexts and audiences.
  • Acknowledges and responds appropriately to contributions or responses from others.
  • Recognises nuances of meaning and the linguistic features that distinguish fact from opinion.
  • Communicates ideas, information, opinions, suggestions, responses and questions clearly.
  • Uses conventions associated with greetings, introductions, modes of address, closure and questioning appropriate to the context.
  • Uses devices to engage the audience, such as making eye contact and using expressive speech features.
  • Adopts standard grammatical patterns.
  • Applies their knowledge of conjunctions for a variety of purposes, including; to indicate cause and effect, show time sequence or make comparisons.
  • Identifies and explores the verbal and non-verbal structures and conventions used by speakers to influence audiences and experiments with them when constructing their own spoken texts.
  • Controls conventions associated with both formal and informal contexts and registers as appropriate.
  • Is sensitive to and responds to the needs of their audience, understanding how particular language choices can include or exclude others.
  • Responds to the different verbal and non-verbal demands of speaking in a small group compared with addressing the whole class.
  • When offering alternative viewpoints or expressing and responding to disagreement or misunderstanding, takes into account the feelings and responses of others.
  • Identifies how speakers use pitch, volume, pace, language type, analogy, irony and humour to influence audiences.
  • Contributes to group goal setting and planning, building on the ideas of others to advance discussion and the development of ideas.
  • Manages a wider range of registers and adapts volume, pace, intonation and gesture to deliver a sustained, effective argument.
  • Recognises the importance of introducing and concluding formal spoken texts clearly.

English: Reading
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Role plays being a competent reader.
  • Recognises familiar symbols.
  • Focuses on expressing meaning rather than on reading words accurately.
  • Points to words as they read.
  • Identifies a word, a letter, a space, a page and where to start reading a book.
  • Makes connections between illustrations and print.
  • Makes connections between their own knowledge and experience and the ideas, events and information in texts.
  • Identifies features of a text that appeal to them: for example, the actions of a favourite character.
  • Uses knowledge of sound/symbol relationships and rhyming words to predict words in the text.
  • Recognise words with special meanings, such as their own names.
  • Can name the letters of the alphabet and associate the letters with particular sounds.
  • Associates grammatical symbols such as, exclamation marks for surprise or emphasis, with meaning.
  • Anticipates what a text may be about from the title and illustrations.
  • Draws on personal experience and knowledge to predict events and information in a text.
  • Uses knowledge of the context, picture cues, word outlines and patterns of language sounds to predict words.
  • Can find familiar words in a sentence and match a sequence of words to a given illustration.
  • Students use texts as sources of information.
  • Constructs and responds to meanings from written texts with familiar vocabulary, predictable structures and frequent illustrations.
  • Reads and comments on stories, illustrated chapter books, informational texts, rhymes, poetry, student-made texts and electronic texts.
  • Is aware that authors and illustrators have particular audiences in mind when they construct texts.
  • Refers to authors and illustrators of books and comments on other books produced by them.
  • When responding to stories, demonstrates understanding by including the main events in appropriate sequence.
  • Discriminates between representations of fantasy and reality in texts.
  • Uses titles, headings and indexes to find particular facts.
  • Recognises main characters and general character traits and offers opinions about characters and events from stories.
  • Uses the sequence of ideas in texts to predict what may come next in a story or informational text.
  • Uses common punctuation marks, such as exclamation and question marks, to assist the meanings being made.
  • Recognises letters and common letter patterns that represent sounds in words.
  • Has a bank of words they can read automatically.
  • Locates reading materials for different purposes.
  • With support, uses a variety of sources to find and organise information on a topic.
  • Identifies links between ideas that are directly stated and located close together.
  • Recalls key ideas from their reading.
  • Self-corrects, re-reads passages and substitutes words in order to maintain meaning.
  • Makes predictions based on their knowledge of the text type.
  • Interprets and discusses some relationships among ideas, information and events, and draw inferences from these in texts with familiar content that include some unfamiliar words, language structures and features, such as figurative language.
  • Selects and uses texts to suit a defined purpose.
  • Recognises the authors’ purposes for writing.
  • Identifies some characteristics that are typical of a reference material, magazines, newspapers, advertisements and electronic media.
  • Identifies and interprets simple symbolic meanings and stereotypes in texts and discusses their purpose and meaning.
  • Infers motives of story characters from their actions.
  • Recognises that characters could have been represented differently.
  • Identifies opinion and point of view in newspaper reports and informational texts.
  • Identifies possible audiences for different texts.
  • Identifies and uses paragraphs, chapter headings and sub-headings to make meaning of a text.
  • Interprets clearly labelled and captioned illustrations.
  • Identifies how language is used to signal logical relationships in texts, such as problem-solution and cause-effect.
  • Understands that the same information can be presented in a variety of ways including words, diagrams and illustrations.
  • Reflects on key ideas, information and events in texts and how texts present information.
  • Integrates a variety of strategies for interpreting texts.
  • Identifies their information needs and locates information resources by browsing, asking for help, using library databases and bookmarked Web sites.
  • Locates information by scanning books for selected topics, looking for keys or symbols when reading diagrams, skims, using tables of content, index, heading and sub-headings and examining pictures.
  • Clarifies or corrects meaning by pausing, re-reading, reading on.
  • Predicts unknown words by considering the context, background information and their knowledge of phonics, grammar, sentence structure and text organisation.
  • Interprets and discusses ideas and information and events in texts containing some unfamiliar concepts and topics.
  • Uses a range of sources, such as the Internet, CD-ROM and print references, to locate, explore and discuss information and ideas.
  • Selects and organises information and ideas from more than one text to provide an overview of a graffiti-related topic.
  • Justifies their own interpretations by referring to the text and to their own knowledge and experience.
  • Recognises that texts are constructed for particular contexts, purposes and to appeal to certain groups.
  • Identifies target audiences for different texts and explains how particular features are designed to appeal to specific markets.
  • Discusses alternative interpretations of texts.
  • Explains judgements of and responses to the portrayal of people and events by drawing on their knowledge, experience and values.
  • Identifies attitudes and values that are implicit in the structure and vocabulary of texts and how they influence meaning.
  • Identifies and discusses how language structures and conventions work to shape readers’ understandings of text.
  • Identifies the main arguments, supporting evidence and conclusions in a text.
  • Justifies their opinions by referring to the content as well as the features of a text, such as the vocabulary and structure.
  • Monitors reading automatically and adjusts strategies to maintain meaning by:
  • re-reading, reading on or slowing down using word identification strategies
  • talking to others about ideas or information
  • keeping a reading log to reflect on their understandings
  • inferring characters’ qualities and feelings
  • differentiating between literal and figurative meanings
  • making notes about key features
  • distinguishing between claims of fact and opinion
  • consulting the index or contents page
  • making diagrams
  • searching for links with personal information
  • Locates resources by using a range of strategies, such as undertaking subject/keyword searches and consulting encyclopaedias, atlases, yearbooks or databases.
  • Selects information appropriate to the purpose for reading.
  • Compares contrasts and categorises ideas and information.
  • Skims and scans a text to find information that supports a particular interpretation of the text.
  • Identifies, discusses, compares and justifies their own interpretations of challenging ideas and issues presented in texts containing complex language structures and features.
  • Explores articles about graffiti vandalism published in the mass media and constructs responses relating them to their own experiences.
  • Discusses and makes critical comparisons between texts presenting a variety of perspectives.
  • Explains possible reasons for varying interpretations of texts.
  • Understands that interpretations are influenced by knowledge of contexts.
  • Explains how readers may be positioned and how different interpretations of a text can be supported.
  • Justifies their own interpretations by linking ideas in texts to their own knowledge, experience and values.
  • Compares representations of some groups (e.g. graffiti vandals) across a range of texts and discusses how attitudes, values and beliefs are reflected in texts.
  • Interprets the effect of language devices such as figurative language and narrative techniques.
  • Describes the possible impact of textual construction on meanings and responses.
  • Infers unstated connections within texts, such as cause, effect and motivations and justify inferences by referring to features such as vocabulary and text structure.
  • Identifies uses of connotation and/or symbolism.
  • Locates systematically relevant information and ideas from a range of texts and interpret and reconstruct them for various purposes.
  • Infers, generalises and draws conclusions from texts.
  • Explores different perspectives through reading, comparing and evaluating a range of texts and relates these perspectives to personal understandings.
  • Compares and evaluates the information on graffiti vandalism by discussing, both orally and in writing, the range of viewpoints and the selection, omission and emphasis of particular aspects of the topic.
  • Relates these perspectives to personal understandings of the world, and, based on texts they have read, makes reasoned generalisations about human behaviour.
  • Considers how social values of historical periods are reflected in the construction and interpretation of texts.
  • Understands that information included in or excluded from texts is significant in making meaning.
  • Realises that the interpretation of texts depends on the reader and his or her socio-cultural background.
  • Justifies their opinions with reference to textual construction and readers’ values.
  • Interprets the conventions and features of texts by comparing similarities and differences in form and meaning.
  • Describes the impact of a range of aspects on textual construction on meanings and responses.
  • Seeks out background information about the text.
  • Relates their reading of a text to other reading and viewing experiences and to wider social and cultural issues.
  • Interprets some aspects of texts on more than one level.
  • Gathers, selects and organises information effectively for specific purposes.
  • Monitors their learning needs as research progresses, refining information requirements before and during research.
  • Poses specific questions while reading texts and re-evaluates their understandings and strategies on an ongoing basis.

English: Viewing
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Retells meanings and makes simple interpretations from visual texts.
  • Recognises common symbols.
  • Retell incidents from videos, films or documentaries.
  • Tells stories using images.
  • Identifies characters they can readily relate to and describes actions typical of the character.
  • Talks about their responses and recognises links between cause and effect.
  • Makes connections between their own knowledge and experience, and the ideas, information and events in viewed texts.
  • Discusses visual texts and give reasons why some are preferred to others.
  • Identifies possible interpretations of images.
  • Identifies music that relates to particular characters and actions.
  • Associates elements of appearance with predictable characters and behaviours.
  • Identifies the sequence of events in a story: for example, they can discuss the time relationships between events.
  • Recognises and uses cues, including background knowledge, to predict and make meaning from visual texts.
  • Draws on their own experience of texts to predict likely endings to familiar texts.
  • Predicts plot development based on cause-and-effect relationships.
  • Uses visual texts as sources of information.
  • Talks about their responses.
  • Identifies, categorises and makes inferences about visual texts based on familiar structures.
  • Recognises that there are different forms of text that can be categorised according to their function, content and intended audience.
  • Compares the function, format and structure of texts such as comics, Web pages, diagrams, timelines and maps.
  • Understands that visual texts are constructed by people to represent real and imaginary experiences.
  • Identifies the differences between narratives involving real and imaginary experiences by the codes and conventions used to represent them.
  • Explains the significance of colour and music in advertisements and video clips to make objects appear more exciting.
  • Identifies visual features of stereotypical graffiti vandals in cartoons, films and television stories.
  • Recognises some of the ways in which visual information can be presented, such as simple diagrams, graphs and maps.
  • Identifies close-up, medium and long shots and discusses the function of each.
  • Understands the basic structure of a narrative and can assemble a series of still photographs to create a plausible narrative sequence.
  • Understands the importance of the timeline in narratives and discusses the effect of changing the timeline of a story.
  • Interprets the meanings of expressions and gestures of characters.
  • Draws on their knowledge of some of the techniques used in television programs or videos to enhance meaning.
  • Notes the predictable patterns in television news formats.
  • Identifies common features of advertisements.
  • Recognises that illustrations as well as text may indicate multiple meanings.
  • Understands that different forms of visual texts contain symbolic meanings and explain ways in which they are constructed to appeal to specific audiences in particular contexts.
  • Identifies ways in which stereotypes are constructed and used to appeal to, promote or denigrate particular sociocultural values:Recognises that different magazines contain advertisements, images and articles designed to appeal to different audiences.
  • Understands how particular conventions work to shape a viewer’s understanding: for example, the use of animation on a Web page.
  • Identifies texts with similar characteristics irrespective of whether they are performed by actors or cartoon characters.
  • Understands that some elements give insight into the time periods that texts represent, such as the age of cars in a film.
  • Is aware of the use of lighting, shading and framing to produce effects.
  • Recognises that filming techniques, such as the selection of shots, lighting, flashbacks, cutaways and sound track, influence the ways in which viewers construct meaning.
  • Draws on their knowledge of conventions, symbols, film techniques, visual and aural codes to make meaning and to find information.
  • Integrates, monitors and adjusts their viewing strategies for different purposes.
  • Recognises the characteristics of a range of text genres, such as picture books, computer games, photographs, theatre sets, television, magazines and comics.
  • Justifies their interpretation of ideas, information and events.
  • Speculates on the purposes for which texts may have been produced.
  • Understands that text interpretations can differ according to the sociocultural background and knowledge of the viewer.
  • Recognises that images are created to appeal to specific audiences.
  • Discusses lighting and music techniques used by film-makers to create a certain mood.
  • Identifies different ways a viewer can be positioned during documentaries.
  • Understands that different text types and purposes require differing viewing approaches and can produce different meanings.
  • Selects, uses and reflects on strategies for interpreting texts:.
  • integrating their knowledge of symbols
  • exploring meanings from different viewpoints
  • using settings to predict plot
  • using screen text to record information from documentaries
  • Justifies own interpretations of ideas in visual texts, using their understanding of the characteristics of a range of narrative structures and contexts.
  • Speculates on the attitudes and values of sub-cultures when describing possible responses to texts.
  • Explain how and why advertisements target particular audiences and how texts can be used to promote media personalities and products.
  • Identifies elements of propaganda in films and political cartoons.
  • Gives reasons why television news and current affairs programs may treat the same news story differently.
  • Identifies ways in which features and effects in one text influence interpretation of other texts.
  • Identifies and explores different perspectives on graffiti vandalism by viewing and comparing a range of texts and relating these perspectives to their understandings of the world.
  • Considers the influence of sociocultural contexts on text construction and interpretation.
  • Appreciates that texts are produced and distributed in particular social and cultural contexts.
  • Recognises that social values of particular periods and groups are reflected in the construction of texts.
  • Identifies the values of the dominant culture portrayed and supported in media texts.
  • Speculates on the immediate social, political or cultural purposes a text serves.
  • Interprets a novel, cartoon and film version of a story, commenting on the effect each form has on their understanding of characters, setting and plot.
  • Describes the possible impact of a range of techniques of textual construction on meanings and responses.
  • Uses their knowledge of sociocultural contexts, genre conventions and continuity techniques in specific media to interpret complex ideas or information in texts.
  • Relates their viewing of texts to other texts and to wider social and cultural issues.
  • Understands that visual texts are constructed and portray values and attitudes, and uses this knowledge to discern the controlling viewpoints and assumptions.

English: Writing
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Produces written symbols with the intention of conveying an idea or message.
  • Uses initial letters and some known letter patterns to represent their ideas.
  • Attempts to write explanations to accompany their drawings.
  • Discusses the purposes of signs and symbols.
  • Shows some awareness sentences and directionality in organising print on the page.
  • Uses simplified oral language structures, usually with correct word order, repeating familiar words and phrases to extend their writing.
  • Uses a range of strategies to help them produce words when they are writing for example:
  • saying words aloud and sound them slowly as they write
  • using alphabet charts
  • using their knowledge of letter names and sounds
  • copying environmental print
  • asking others for help
  • dictating their message for others to write
  • Writes simple imaginative and informative texts that include some related ideas.
  • Attempts to write texts such as lists, letters, recounts, narratives, procedures, instructions, messages, rhymes and simple descriptions, including some relevant ideas that link logically together.
  • Uses some language structures and features so that their writing can be interpreted readily by others.
  • Produces texts that show some evidence of organisation of subject matter and follow some of the conventions of writing.
  • Writes simple and compound sentences, combining clauses with linking words: for example, ‘and’, ‘but’, ‘then’, ‘because’.
  • Uses some punctuation marks, such as full stops and capital letters, accurately, but may over-generalise when experimenting with, for example, apostrophes and exclamation marks.
  • Attempts to spell a wide range of words.
  • Accurately spells frequently-used and readily-recognised words.
  • Approximations to correct spelling are phonetically and/or visually plausible.
  • Uses a small range of processes and strategies for planning, writing and reviewing their work.
  • Experiments with interrelating ideas and information when writing.
  • Combines ideas in a logical sequence including relevant information on several aspects of the topic.
  • Selects an appropriate text type for a particular writing purpose.
  • Considers some needs and expectations of readers before writing.
  • Uses appropriate text organisation to develop ideas and information in instructions, narratives, recounts and reports.
  • Writes simple, compound and complex sentences.
  • Achieves subject-verb agreement, noun-pronoun agreement and consistent verb tense.
  • Groups sentences about common ideas together.
  • Uses question marks, exclamation marks and commas for lists accurately and experiments with apostrophes and direct speech marks.
  • Commonly-used words are spelt accurately.
  • Brainstorms concepts and vocabulary, discusses ideas and prepares a plan or a structured overview before writing.
  • Re-reads own writing to maintain meaning and edits by deleting or adding words to clarify meaning or add information.
  • Proofreads for spelling and punctuation errors.
  • Uses their knowledge of word meaning, visual patterns, sounds and spelling rules to work out the spelling of unfamiliar words.
  • Constructs narratives that include relevant details and events designed to develop the plot.
  • States a point of view and chooses supporting evidence to shape an argument.
  • Selects, classifies and organises information for a factual report.
  • Considers the different backgrounds and knowledge of the audience and includes or excludes explanations or definitions according to need.
  • Chooses vocabulary to enhance the descriptiveness and accuracy of their writing.
  • Considers audience expectations of surface features, such as layout, font and handwriting, recognising that these may vary according to situation and purpose.
  • Writes appropriately-constructed sentences.
  • Links ideas using words such as ‘but’, ‘instead’, ‘also’ and ‘because’ to produce coherent paragraphs.
  • Uses organisational features such as paragraphs, headings and captions to enhance their writing.
  • Uses consistently most punctuation marks, with developing control over apostrophes, dashes and punctuation for direct speech.
  • Spells most of the words needed in their writing.
  • Plans writing through discussion.
  • Re-reads work to check sequence and sense.
  • Uses a checklist to guide proofreading.
  • Uses ideas or information from external sources where appropriate.
  • Spells an increasing vocabulary of words accurately.
  • They apply a range of strategies for spelling less-familiar words and recognise the importance of conventional spelling for published texts.
  • Writes detailed descriptions that convey clear impressions and create sustained narratives with well-developed and integrated settings, characters, events and resolutions.
  • Writes informative and persuasive texts informed by personal perspectives and/or relevant information from other sources.
  • Constructs written arguments that state and justify viewpoints.
  • Elaborates and links relevant ideas in sequence and organises content in paragraphs that are focused on one idea and related to the topic sentence.
  • Selects language to suit a specific audience, purpose and context and adapts the language structures and conventions necessary for clear communication.
  • Introduces readers to the purpose and content in ways appropriate to the text type.
  • Uses standard and non-standard forms and conventions appropriately.
  • Produces internally-cohesive paragraphs and links them consistently to develop coherent sequences of ideas in informational texts.
  • Uses organisational markers and grammatical items to establish time, place, qualification and connection.
  • Employs appropriate and varied vocabulary and phrasing to achieve clarity of expression.
  • Applies appropriate conventions of spelling and punctuation in crafted texts, and ensures the correct spelling of all words in writing that has been drafted and edited fully.
  • Anticipates audience needs in selecting information, planning and reviewing writing.
  • Uses pre-writing processes to generate and organise ideas and information, such as brainstorming, structured overview, listing, flow chart, and retrieval chart and peer consulting.
  • Accesses information from external sources systematically and, where appropriate, paraphrases ideas and information from external sources.
  • Proofreads their writing routinely, applying strategies as appropriate, and reorders or modifies sentences to achieve their intended meaning
  • Writes with a clear sense of purpose and structure and explores different perspectives when writing detailed information and ideas for different audiences.
  • Uses a range of text types, including sustained and unified narratives, logical, written arguments with clearly-defined, justified opinions and substantiated conclusions; extended analytical texts that combine information from different sources to express a point of view; and informational texts that convey detailed information.
  • Produces texts conveying a clear sense of purpose, structured around a relevant controlling idea with supporting information or events being developed.
  • Orients readers appropriately and succinctly and sustain an appropriate tone and authorial position or point of view.
  • Predicts some of the characteristics and expectations of particular audiences and adjusts their writing accordingly.
  • Modifies different text forms, experimenting with content and style with the intention of influencing particular audiences.
  • Selects and uses information to influence readers’ responses.
  • Experiments with vocabulary and phrasing in an attempt to enhance originality, variety or accuracy.
  • Uses a variety of simple, compound and complex sentences to produce fluent and succinct writing, varying syntax for emphasis and variety and experimenting with more sophisticated forms of punctuation, such as semi-colons and colons.
  • Considers carefully the purpose and audience of their writing and applies and manipulates text elements to achieve the desired effect.
  • Uses pre-writing processes to analyse the task, plan their approach, cluster, sort and order ideas.
  • Reflects on, evaluates and reorganises ideas and information, incorporating ideas and information from external sources using relevant conventions of reference quotation and citation.
  • Revises and edits at the word and sentence level for correctness clarity and variety, and at the whole-text level for appropriateness of content and organisation.

Health and Physical Education: Knowledge and Understandings
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Describes own characteristics, strengths and challenges.
  • Describes characteristics of being well.
  • Identifies and explains safety rules in the classroom and school grounds.
  • Describes an appropriate circle of family and friends from which they can get help.
  • Describes different aspects of being well.
  • Describes ways of behaving that consider the physical, social and emotional wellbeing of self and others.
  • Explains what to say and do when they feel uncomfortable or unsafe in different situations.
  • Questions why people might engage in graffiti.
  • Describes ways to enhance own and others’ health and well-being.
  • Distinguishes between the different components of health that people of all ages need to develop in order to be healthy including physical health, social health and mental and emotional health.
  • Analyses the extent to which peers, advertising and the media can influence their behaviour.
  • Explains the positive and negative effects of peer pressure.
  • Develops and implements a simple action plan for a time when they find themselves in a group committing at act of graffiti vandalism.
  • Describes actions they can take to enhance their health and cope with influences on their health behaviours.
  • Assesses the potential risk in situations and describes ways of taking appropriate preventative action.
  • Analyses the positive and negative effects of peer pressure on health behaviours.
  • Chooses appropriate methods to appraise their own and others’ health and safety practices in relation to graffiti vandalism and graffiti removal.
  • Researches, plans, participates in, implements, evaluates, reflects upon and reports on activities designed to avoid or reduce risks and enhance their own and others’ health, safety and physical activity.
  • Describes how to resist pressures to act in socially unacceptable ways.
  • Analyses the myths and stereotypes of the graffiti vandal.
  • Assesses the reliability of information sources about graffiti vandalism and the effect of this information on their own and others’ behaviours.
  • Analyses the link between graffiti vandalism and health issues.
  • Researches, analyses critically and reports on the impact of graffiti vandalism on family and community health.
  • Plans strategies to resist negative influences on their behaviour.
  • Uses a range of technologies to research, analyse and report on the effects of legislation and social factors on graffiti vandalism.
  • Assesses the different levels of power people have in their relationships and discuss acceptable levels in specific relationships.
  • Describes the importance of family, friendships, networks and communication in supporting the mental and emotional health of people.

Health and Physical Education: Self-Management Skills
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Gives examples of emotions in different situations.
  • Discusses and demonstrates how to adjust emotions to suit different situations.
  • Considers short term consequences of actions.
  • Describes options for ways to behave or react in a given situation (e.g. when told ‘no’).
  • Discusses how to recognise signs of intense emotions.
  • Demonstrates strategies to cope with intense emotions.
  • Considers longer-term consequences of actions.
  • Describes personal responsibility in a social situation.
  • Describes ways of managing peer pressure.
  • Describes ways of managing stressful situation.
  • Discusses the impact of friends and the media on personal decisions.
  • Considers a range of factors when making decisions.
  • Identifies the positive and negative consequences of an action.
  • Monitors the outcomes of a personal decision.
  • Uses assertive communication to support a personal decision.
  • Considers a variety of elements when making a decision.
  • Describes positive and negative consequences of personal decisions in the short, medium and long-term.
  • Identifies ways of minimising negative influences on personal decisions.
  • Analyses ways in which community responses protect us as individuals.
  • Describes the impact of personal and group decisions on the health and safety of themselves, others and the environment.

Health and Physical Education: Interpersonal Skills
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Uses basic communication and cooperation skills when interacting with familiar people.
  • Explains ways of avoiding conflict when friends have different ideas.
  • Explains reasons for rules.
  • Uses communication and cooperation skills to share feelings and meet basic needs when interacting with other people.
  • Negotiates solutions to problems.
  • Negotiates rules for a group activity.
  • Uses communication and cooperation skills that contribute to interpersonal and group interactions.
  • Demonstrates respect for others while expressing own view assertively.
  • Recognises the differences between assertiveness, aggressiveness and submissiveness in a given situation.
  • Uses active listening skills to identify issues.
  • Describes ways of supporting people who have concerns.
  • Describes the code of conduct for a given group and situation.
  • Uses communication skills to cope with conflict in a positive way.
  • Describes ways of cooperating with a group in order to enhance safety.
  • Uses communication skills to negotiate a conflict of values.
  • Minimises possibilities of conflict through preparation and planning.
  • Adjusts assertive communication skills in challenging situations.

Mathematics: Working mathematically
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Asks simple mathematical questions of other children.
  • Represents things mentioned in a problem with materials and manipulates the materials to find a solution.
  • Is aware that an answer ‘looks wrong’.
  • Offers new questions about the data.
  • Compares ways of representing a problem.
  • Can move freely between words and numerical expressions of data.
  • Expects that answers should stay the same and reviews answers if results are different.
  • Generates problems to be solved mathematically.
  • Clarifies problem and draws out essential information, ignoring irrelevant information.
  • Checks and corrects information noting inaccuracies in their thinking, method or calculation.
  • Asks questions to understand the essential features of a problem, to clarify the nature of a problem and to get started.
  • Considers how best to represent the key features of the problem and how to organise the information to make it easily accessible.
  • Predicts or estimates answers to questions and checks that their answers are roughly as expected.
  • Questions how sensible a solution is in terms of their everyday knowledge of the situation.
  • Comments upon conjectures in the light of the results of testing them and revises them if needed.
  • Extends investigations by posing mathematical questions of their own.
  • Suggests questions left unanswered by their mathematical work.
  • Describes a plan for their investigation, generates and lists possibilities, explains why they think they have listed all possibilities and checks that what they are doing appears helpful.
  • Generates and tabulates examples systematically and looks for a pattern in the tabulated data.
  • Systematically eliminates possibilities.
  • Checks that answers fit specifications and make sense within the given context.
  • Alters answers obtained mathematically to make them fit the realities of the situation.
  • Identifies and organises sub-problems that assist with a solution.
  • Lists a series of decisions to be made and estimates and calculations to be done.
  • Uses the strategy of working backward by using the information provided in a problem in the reverse order to that given.
  • Explains why a solution is a good one even if it isn’t fully accurate or correct:Makes generalisations by independently generating and tabulating examples and looking for common features.
  • Uses the structure of a situation or pattern to explain why a generalisation ‘must be true’.
  • Tests generalisations using varied and systematic checks.

Mathematics: Measurement
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Uses expressions such as before, now and after to link the passing of time with repeating events in their own lives.
  • Refers to familiar recurring events when describing time, such as sundown, home time and playtime.
  • Uses appropriate language and shows understanding of the concepts of:‘shorter’, ‘tallest’, ‘longer’, ‘same length’, ‘near’, ‘far’, ‘higher’, ‘lower’ to describe the attribute of length.
  • ‘heavier’, ‘lighter’ to describe mass.
  • ‘holds more’ or ‘holds less’ to describe the capacity of containers that are clearly different.
  • ‘about’, ‘almost’, ‘nearly’, ‘not quite’, ‘just over’ and ‘a bit under’ when making approximations.
  • Distinguishes the attributes of length, area, capacity and mass when comparing things and chooses something that relates well to the attribute of interest to use as units.
  • Compares directly and orders things by length, area, capacity, mass and time.
  • Compares indirectly lengths and capacities, and uses uniform units carefully to measure lengths and capacities.
  • Suggests ways of comparing the size of two things that cannot be matched directly.
  • Estimates the order of things by length, area, mass and capacity and makes numerical estimates of length using units that can be seen or handled.
  • Realises that using a uniform unit repeatedly to match an object gives a measure of the size of the object, and chooses suitable and uniform things to use as units and a common unit to compare two things.
  • Compares directly and indirectly and orders things by length, area, capacity, mass, time and angle, measures them by counting uniform units and uses standard scales to measure length and time.
  • Understands and measures perimeter directly and uses straightforward arithmetic to determine perimeters, key elapsed time and other measurements which cannot be obtained directly.
  • Attends informally to scale when making and using plans, maps and models.
  • Makes sensible numerical estimates using units that can be seen or handled and uses language such as ‘between’ to describe estimates.
  • Selects appropriate attributes.
  • Distinguishes perimeter from area, area from volume and time from elapsed time.
  • Chooses units of a sensible size for descriptions and comparisons to be made.
  • Measures area by counting uniform units, including part-units where required.
  • Measures volume by counting cubes and length.
  • Measures mass, capacity, time and angle by reading whole-number scales.
  • Understands and uses scale factors involving small whole numbers and unit fractions for straightforward tasks.
  • The student uses the known size of familiar things to help make and improve estimates, including centimetres, metres, kilograms, litres and minutes.
  • Selects attributes, units and instruments for measuring things and uses the relationship between metric prefixes to move between units.
  • Uses a range of whole number and decimal scales for measuring, including making measurements that are more accurate than the available scales allow.
  • Understands and uses scale factors and the effect of scaling linear dimensions on lengths, areas and volumes of figures and objects produced on grids and with cubes.
  • Makes sensible estimates of length, area, mass, volume, capacity, angle and time in standard units and identifies unreasonable estimates of things.
  • Decides what measurements are needed in order to complete practical tasks.
  • Ensures that units used are consistent with each other and with any formula used.
  • Makes or collects measurements to planned levels of accuracy.
  • Integrates measurement information from several sources in order to complete practical tasks.
  • Understands and uses similarity, including trigonometric ratios, and Pythagoras’s Theorem to solve problems involving right triangles and scale drawing.
  • Estimates in situations in which it is sensible to do so, including those where direct measurement is impossible or impractical, and judges whether estimates and measurements are reasonable.

Mathematics: Chance and Data
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Participates in classifying and sequencing objects and pictures and, with guidance, poses questions about them.
  • Displays objects and pictures and describes data in words and numbers.
  • Reaches simple conclusions based on counting.
  • Realises that we can answer some questions ourselves by collecting, classifying and sequencing data.
  • Applies unambiguous and familiar criteria consistently when classifying and sequencing.
  • Displays and summarises data based on one-to-one correspondences between data and representation.
  • Describes what their own and classmates’ data collections display.
  • Makes statements about how results might be changed by the questions asked or the method of gathering the information.
  • Suggests information to collect to answer particular questions.
  • Carefully collects data so as to capture all responses.
  • Organises and classifies data.
  • Understands that graphs can be drawn in different ways to show the data.
  • Interprets information presentation in tables, diagrams, bar graphs and pictographs produced by themselves and others.
  • Places events in order from those least likely to those most likely to happen on the basis of numerical and other information about the events.
  • Collaborates with peers to plan what data to collect and how to classify, sequence and tabulate them to answer particular questions.
  • Varies methods to answer different questions.
  • Displays frequency and measurement data using simple scales on axes and some grouping.
  • Summarises data with simple fractions; highest, lowest and middle scores and means.
  • Reads and makes sensible statements about the information provided in tables, diagrams, line and bar graphs, fractions and means.
  • Comments on how well the data answer questions.
  • Interprets and makes numerical statements of probability based on lists of equally-likely outcomes and using fractions and percentages.
  • Collaborates to plan and refine survey questions and other observation methods for one-variable and two-variable data and simulations.
  • Collects and records data, including using databases that are planned with help.
  • Displays one-variable and two-variable data in tables.
  • Plots and summarises data with fractions, percentages, means and medians.
  • Reads and makes sensible statements about trends and patterns in the data in tables, diagrams, plots, graphs and summary statistics.
  • Comments on data collection processes and results.
  • Estimates probabilities and proportions based on primary or secondary data collection.
  • Plans experiments, surveys, simulations and secondary data collection collaboratively and independently, checking that data are recorded and organised correctly, including those in databases.
  • Displays and summarises data to show location and variability, including situations where some grouping of data is required, in order to compare data sets and to show relationships between data sets, including box and whisker plots and standard scores.
  • Interprets, makes comparisons and describes relationships in collected and published data from tables, diagrams, plots, graphs, text, summary statistics and databases, distinguishing between sample and population data.

Science: Investigating
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Contributes relevant ideas, based on their own experiences, to a class investigation in response to teacher questions.
  • Collects the appropriate materials for the activity.
  • Makes simple observations related to the five senses.
  • Shares observations of their investigations.
  • Makes suggestions as to what their observations mean, using simple generalisations.
  • Points to a part of the experiment that went well or where they had difficulty.
  • Considers some variables and identifies the focuses for experiments.
  • Guesses what might happen.
  • Observes, classifies and describes data.
  • Follows instructions for safe practice.
  • Explains what happened in their experiments.
  • Can describe whether the outcomes were what they expected and if the outcome matched their guesses.
  • Plans investigations using consistent methods for fair testing.
  • Uses simple equipment in a consistent manner.
  • Records results in appropriate forms.
  • Structures, organises and displays data to show relationships.
  • Summarises patterns in the data.
  • Identifies difficulties experienced with the investigations.
  • Plans investigation considering variables to be changed.
  • Takes care with data collection so that data are accurate.
  • Uses equipment appropriately.
  • Assesses risks in experiments and takes appropriate precautions.
  • Summarises the data and attempts to explain patterns.
  • Writes conclusions that summarise and describe patterns in the data, explaining them in terms of a simple science concept.
  • Identifies difficulties encountered in investigations and makes general suggestions for improvements in order to overcome these difficulties.
  • Examines a situation, formulates a question or hypothesis for testing and plans a carefully-designed experiment in which several variables are controlled.
  • Selects and uses equipment that is appropriate to the task and that will enhance accuracy.
  • Uses preliminary trials of the experimental procedure to improve the procedure or measurement technique, taking enough measurements to gauge reliability.
  • Undertake random samples in fieldwork to improve control of variables or to enhance the interpretation of contributory factors.
  • Chooses the most appropriate graph for the data they have collected and are accurate in their plotting.
  • Writes conclusions that describe the patterns in the data or relationships between the variables in terms of abstract science concepts.
  • Conclusions closely reflect the magnitudes and patterns in the data.
  • Suggests specific changes that would improve the techniques used or the design of the investigation.
  • Uses scientific knowledge to analyse a situation, identify key variables that influence the phenomenon, formulate a question or hypothesis for testing, make predictions and plan for accurate measurements.
  • Selects appropriate equipment for the investigation that enhances the accuracy of observations and measurements and safety.
  • Selects the type of graph and scales that display data effectively.
  • Evaluates questions or hypotheses in terms of the data and draws conclusions that are consistent with the data, explained in terms of scientific knowledge and related to the question, hypothesis or prediction.
  • Recognises when differences in observations or measurements for repeat trials or replicates are too large and represent error.
  • Identifies inconsistencies in data and the main source of error and can suggest improvements that will reduce the source of error.

Science: Natural and processed materials
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Recognises different materials in their daily life and are aware that they are used for making different things.
  • Describes properties of materials using their senses.
  • Identifies materials that can be poured.
  • Describes the way materials change.
  • Recognises that a variety of different objects can be made from the same materials.
  • Recognises that some materials are used to make certain types of things and not others.
  • Sorts similar materials into groups based on what materials are used for.
  • Recognises the cause of a change in a material.
  • Conducts experiments and makes statements about different materials.
  • Compares the ways that different materials change.
  • Compares the differences in the extent to which things dissolve in water or other solvent.
  • Recognises that there can be different types of one material and they have different uses depending on their properties.
  • Knows that materials are composed of parts (e.g. grains or fibres) some of which may not be visible with the naked eye but may be visible with a magnifying glass.
  • Compares the solubilities of substances in different liquids (solvents) and groups them according to their solubility.
  • Knows that chemical changes are permanent or irreversible (the substance can’t be changed back to its original state) and that these occur in daily life.
  • Explores the relationships between properties, composition and use of different materials.
  • Knows that whether a substance dissolves depends on the quantity and type of substance.
  • Recognises by using a magnifying glass or microscope that materials are made up of much smaller parts than they first appear.
  • Groups together similar changes to materials and makes generalisations about them by identifying patterns.
  • Explores and describes how the properties of materials can vary depending on the proportions of the substances of which they are composed and recognises that this may alter their suitability for a particular use.
  • Relates properties of materials to the nature of their constituent particles.
  • Uses atomic and molecular structure to explain properties, such as conductivity, solubility, melting point and hardness.
  • Understands that chemical tests can determine the suitability of materials for particular purposes and the safety precautions to be taken in using materials in terms of their properties and effects.
  • Uses chemical formulae and balanced equations to describe reactions.
  • Recognises common reaction types by describing when a chemical reaction has occurred.
  • Uses tabulated data to compare physical properties of substances and explain observations.
  • Explain the differences between families of materials.
  • Explains how the periodic table can be used to predict properties of substances.
  • Explains physical and chemical change in systems and families of chemical reactions.
  • Explains chemical and physical processes and how they are used in chemical systems.
  • Quantifies physical and chemical changes and interactions using relevant concepts and principles.
  • Explains the influence of factors such as temperature, concentration and pressure on physical and chemical changes.
  • They explain in terms of the kinetic theory how gas volume can be changed by pressure or heat.

Society and Environment: Investigation, communication and participation
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Plans investigations by linking to own experiences.
  • Understands the difference between a statement and a question.
  • Suggests simple questions but may not suggest how these questions can be investigated.
  • Identifies some sources of information.
  • Gathers information by talking to others or viewing videos and pictures.
  • Collects and sorts information into simple categories.
  • Provides facts related to the topic.
  • Often reproduces information without internalising it, seeing the investigation or activity as a one-off event.
  • Accepts information at face value or because it comes from a person of authority.
  • Findings are communicated in ways that reflect their literacy skills, such as drawings, role-plays, lists, collages and written forms.
  • Reflections include personal responses.
  • Identifies concepts related to a topic, drawing on prior knowledge and experience.
  • Suggests ways to investigate a topic.
  • Plans investigations using one source of information and one method.
  • Collects information with simple interviews or surveys, developed with teacher assistance.
  • Disregards information not relevant to the topic.
  • Interested in different perspectives but cannot always identify them.
  • Sorts information in sequence.
  • Makes literal interpretations from sources without making inferences.
  • Does not discriminate between fact and opinion.
  • Identifies the immediate implications of their findings.
  • Reviews and reflects on current understandings of topics.
  • Identifies aspects to focus on.
  • Identifies and clusters ideas and makes simple predictions.
  • Identifies a range of questions, sources, technologies, methods and protocols.
  • Selects information recognising techniques of persuasion and stereotyping.
  • Records key ideas, noting gaps in information and draws simple inferences based on personal perspectives.
  • Communicates findings emphasising the form of the report rather than the information found.
  • Conclusions include different perspectives.
  • Reviews and reflects on current understandings of a topic.
  • Identifies appropriate aspects to focus on, variables and sources of information.
  • Reflects on the topic and makes predictions of the possible information that might be found.
  • Plans to collect information using an appropriate organiser.
  • Identifies factors indicating the currency and accurateness of the information.
  • Selects relevant information from primary and secondary sources.
  • Records information using different formats.
  • Uses recording formats to make comparisons, inferences, look for patterns and make generalisations.
  • Respects the views and opinions of others.
  • Evaluates findings and justifies gaps in information.
  • Clarifies specific purposes for investigation, devises questions that have a critical focus and constructs a search plan.
  • Identifies a range of sources of information.
  • Designs and constructs research processes that enhance the specific purpose of the investigation.
  • Accepts and follows protocols.
  • Matches information to be reported with the best type of visual representation.
  • Draws conclusions that present a particular viewpoint that can be supported by the evidence collected.
  • Justifies conclusions by referring to patterns evident in the data collected and in consideration of facts, opinions and motives.
  • Understands that findings may lead to new questions.
  • Formulates their own hypotheses, decides on the aspects to be considered and makes prediction based on the sources used for investigations.
  • Develops questions that require the identification of trends, analysis, critical evaluation, perspectives and relationships.
  • Selects appropriate data sources and recording techniques for an argument or point of view.
  • Asks questions that focus on discriminating between points of view.
  • Identifies developments over time.
  • Constructs conclusions about the accuracy of their hypotheses.
  • Recognises inconsistencies in data.
  • Justifies attitudes and opinions in the context of events/ time.
  • Draws conclusions for arguments by analysing viewpoints for accuracy, bias and omission.
  • Justifies positions by discussing logically and considering the viewpoints and evidence.

Society and Environment: Natural and social systems
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Names rules.
  • Understands that rules should be obeyed.
  • Connects rules to consequences.
  • Is aware that rules are made by significant others.
  • Interprets rules from personal experience.
  • Links rights and responsibilities.
  • Is aware that rules vary depending on the context.
  • Understands that there is a relationship between law making, law enforcement and the role of government.
  • Understands that laws change over time.
  • Understands that laws made by government change in response to the needs expressed by people in the community.
  • Understands that rules and laws are made and revised to maintain order.
  • Understands that there are legal ways to express dissent.
  • Describes the role of the citizen in legal and political systems and the different ways in which these systems affect people.
  • Understands how and why political and legal systems respond to changes created by differing groups in societies (e.g. lobby groups, media)
  • Describes how political and legal systems are able to adapt to changes.
  • Describes how legal and political systems are linked in decision making professes when making decisions about graffiti management.
  • Describes ways in which people can influence political, legal and economic decisions.

Society and Environment: Culture
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Is aware of their attitudes, feelings and beliefs to different things, ideas or events.
  • Understands that cultural groups give people a sense of belonging.
  • Describes different groups and forms of group expression.
  • Describes similarities and differences between people.
  • Describes differences in roles and relationships.
  • Is aware that their own attitudes, feelings and sensitivities towards graffiti are part of their belief systems.
  • Understands that people who belong to graffiti crews have a ‘culture’ or way of being.
  • Describes some of the attitudes, feelings and beliefs that a group they belong to holds.
  • Describes some of the attributes of ‘graffiti culture’ that contribute to a sense of belonging or group identity.
  • Compares graffiti culture of ‘graffiti vandals’ and ‘urban artists’.
  • Understands that there are ‘traditional’ and ‘non-traditional’ aspects that form part of their belief systems.
  • Understands that that there may be a range of views within a group.
  • Identifies elements of graffiti culture that may or may not be present today.
  • Identifies some elements of graffiti culture that have changed over time.
  • Identifies needs that lead to the formation of a new graffiti cub-culture.
  • Identifies aspects of graffiti groups such as clothing, friendship or group behaviour.
  • Understands that there are different perspectives on graffiti crews.
  • Describes some ritual, rites of passage or social norms of a graffiti group.
  • Understands that there is a range of graffiti groups and that they reflect different beliefs and social organisations.
  • Links the beliefs of graffiti groups with their behaviour.
  • Describes ways in which people’s identities within a group are linked to the group’s beliefs and social organisation.
  • Recognises that different groups have different perspectives based on their histories, beliefs and traditions.
  • Understands that the belief systems of graffiti groups different from their own.
  • Describes the complexity of relationships within graffiti groups.
  • Makes generalisations about how groups function over time.
  • understands the influence of beliefs and traditions and how these can change over time.
  • identifies beliefs of a graffiti group in another time.
  • Understands that government legislation reinforces cohesion and diversity.
  • Analysis the ways in which graffiti groups have changed their beliefs and social organisation and the way these changes have helped them survive.
  • Understands that the complexity of materials and non-materials cultural influences have affected people’s behaviour.
  • Understands that graffiti culture has changed as a result of travel, immigration, media and an increasing emphasis on materialism.
  • Describes ways in which graffiti cultures have impacted on society and contemporary culture.
  • Understands that there is a complex interrelationship of cultural concepts, practices and perspectives and that these have impacted in the cohesion and diversity of groups.
  • Describes ways in which gender influences graffiti groups.
  • Describes ways in which media influences our understanding of graffiti cultures.

Society and Environment: Place and Space
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Identifies the features of their community.
  • Knows that people care for spaces that are important to them.
  • Shows an interest in and respect for the environment of the school and the community.
  • Identifies the features of places where graffiti occurs.
  • Explains how graffiti changes the nature of an environment.
  • Identifies a space that needs to be cared for.
  • Identifies the significance of features of places where graffiti occurs.
  • Generalises from specific instances of graffiti to the impact on other similar locations.
  • Explains differing views on the way in which a space can be cared for.
  • Describes similarities in features of places and the common significance of these features.
  • Explains how a particular location has affected the ways in which graffiti vandals have used it.
  • Identifies the conflicting values evidence in people’s use of places.
  • Describes similarities and differences in features of places and the significance of these features.
  • Describes reasons for variations and/or similarities between different locations where graffiti occurs.
  • Describes the interactions between the environment and the ways in which graffiti vandals use them.
  • Describes ways in which social, economic and environmental factors influence decisions in caring for a place.
  • Identifies short term and long term relationships between graffiti vandals and locations.
  • Describes ways in which graffiti vandals change their patterns of use of locations and the reasons for these changes.
  • Describes ways in which social, economic and environmental factors influence decisions in caring for a place and the ways in which that care changes over time.

Society and Environment: Time, continuity and change
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Describes events in terms of what happened, what is happening or what might happen.
  • Explains change in simplistic terms.
  • Is aware that certain things do not change significantly over time.
  • Understands that their own life stories and those of others can be different.
  • Describes things that have happened in the past and links then with the time in which they occurred.
  • Identifies events, people and ideas that have been significant in the past.
  • Explains that a version of history is told from a particular perspective.
  • Explains why some people, events and ideas have been important.
  • Describes how people, events or ideas impacted on their times.
  • Explains changes that happened from these events.
  • Identifies different perspectives of people, events and ideas.
  • Links people, events and ideas within a particular time period sequentially.
  • Connects people’s beliefs and their behaviours and actions.
  • Draws conclusions that explain changes that happened in a time period.
  • Explains how versions of history are shaped by the interests and values of the author.
  • Compares, contrasts and explains relationships between ideas, beliefs and values in different time periods.
  • Explains how political, economic or cultural forces promoted change or continuity.
  • Describes influences that lead to the formation of perspectives, versions and interpretations about the past.
  • Explains how the past influences the present.
  • Describes ways in which beliefs have changed or continued over time.
  • Explains how perspectives and interpretations of the past change over time and may be different from the perspectives we hold today.

Society and Environment: Resources (Use and management of resources)
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Identifies some of the resources used to create graffiti.
  • Describes how things can be bought and sold and how people obtain goods and services using money and/or credit for payment.
  • Describes practice in relation to graffiti (e.g. that is should be buffed).
  • Names resources used in graffiti removal, reduction and prevention.
  • Describes a variety of resources that can be used.
  • Suggests ways in which graffiti vandalism might be managed.
  • Explains that because resources are limited and can have different uses, choices must be made about how to use them.
  • Explains that different people have different priorities for the use of resources.
  • Describes ways in which people are using resources more effectively or efficiently.
  • Creates a management plan that includes costs and timeframes.
  • Describes different ways in which resources could be used.
  • Explains the choices people have, and some of the decisions that they make in the management of resources in terms such as renewable, efficient and ethical.
  • Explains the importance of gathering accurate information for effective decision making.
  • Creates a management plan and explains the choices they have made.
  • Describes ways in which limited resources affect the ways in which graffiti can be managed.
  • Describes how social, environmental and economic factors affect graffiti management.
  • Management plan includes prioritising of spending.
  • Describes ways in which government decisions, the influence of business or the media affect the ways in which resources are managed.
  • Explains options that could lead to a better use of resources.
  • Describes ways in which management decisions may differ in different contexts.

Society and Environment: Resources (People and work)
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Describes some of the roles of people in the community.
  • Identifies some of the skills and resources used in jobs.
  • Identifies part time, full time, casual and unpaid work choices.
  • Describes the competencies needed to be successful employees.
  • Describes skills associated with working in the structure of a workplace, use of technology and work practice.
  • Describes skills associated with working productively and safely.

Society and Environment: Active citizenship
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Shows concern for and sensitivity to people in their family and friendship groups.
  • Talks about rules (classroom, school, community and/or local government) in relation to graffiti and urban art and understands processes for their formulation and review.
  • Identifies and classifies decisions related to graffiti management.
  • Discusses which decisions will affect them in their local community.
  • Identifies how decisions are made.
  • Explores ways in which decisions impact on people.
  • Considers the purpose of a democratic civil society and discusses how it can be achieved (e.g. how we are governed, how we treat each other, the society we aspire to).
  • Identifies ways in which decisions about graffiti support society.
  • Identifies ways that people attempt to influence government decisions (e.g. rally, media campaign, petition) and how these vary depending on which level of government they are trying to influence.
  • Identifies how decisions have been influenced by people and describes the methods that these people used.

Technology and Enterprise: Technology process
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Links the form of a product and its use by investigating.
  • Asks questions as to why we need particular products and how they assist us in our daily living.
  • Develops their ideas and designs through trial and error.
  • Experiments with different ways of achieving their goals.
  • Chooses resources for particular purposes.
  • Describes and draws pictures to convey what they intend the solution to be.
  • Uses a variety of materials, to make their product or a model.
  • Uses tools with care and safety.
  • Modifies their methods and products in response to comments from their peers or teachers.
  • Explains how their creations work, telling others how they feel about what they have done.
  • Asks relevant questions about how technologies affect aspects of people’s lives.
  • Relates particular technologies to paid and unpaid work.
  • Identifies the advantages of using technologies, such as wearing protective masks.
  • Considers and compares alternative processes or technologies.
  • Generates ideas from their own personal experiences, enriched through sharing with others.
  • Communicates their designs verbally and in written forms, such as 2D representations, drawings or models.
  • Designs are detailed and identifiable to others, although not to scale.
  • Uses related technical terms specific to the particular technology to describe these designs and present plans.
  • Plans their production process.
  • Identifies practical constraints, such as limited resources, and sharing things such as tools, space and materials.
  • Compare solution with original intentions.
  • Reflects on their ideas and actions to make suggestions for improvements.
  • Shares ideas with others, formally and informally.
  • Examines a range of technologies to identify key design features, especially aesthetic qualities and social and environmental effects.
  • Investigates technologies, considering issues, values, needs and opportunities related to their use, identifying operating costs, safety procedures and processes for the organisation and management of the technology and how they affect people.
  • Selects products and processes that minimise the impact on the environment during operation and disposal.
  • Consider other influencing factors and constraints, such as availability of materials and tools, personal skills and time, the ‘rules’ set for the process and the final quality of the solution.
  • Experiments with the presentation and format of their designs, combining drawings, models, diagrams and written statements, which they annotate.
  • Provides reasons for their choices of resources and the processes they intend using.
  • Plans a production process in which resources are selected and used safely and efficiently.
  • Adheres to the production techniques and standards laid down in the design brief.
  • Works individually and with others to improve their designs and production processes, overcoming difficulties encountered.
  • Uses specific criteria to judge how well their ideas, products, processes, systems and built environments satisfy their design brief and suggests, gives reasons for and carries out simple modifications using their personal experience and preferences.
  • Examines the values and beliefs of both the developer and the user, extending their understanding beyond familiar personal applications to the less-familiar examples available in the community.
  • Considers questions of an ethical nature related to perceived impacts on society and the environment and queries whether the needs of the larger community have really been met.
  • Examines existing technologies to consider how ideas that demonstrate the positive aspects of aesthetic, social and environmental values can be applied in their designs.
  • Generates ideas, prepares production proposals and communicates ideas for designs using graphical representations, recognisable conventions, symbols and technical terms and models made from materials that reflect aesthetic and environmental values and meet functional requirements.
  • Displays initiative and drive when carrying out the steps in the production process they have established.
  • Identifies, assesses and manages risks when planning and organising resources and achieves results safely and efficiently that meet the requirements of their design.
  • Uses specific criteria based on the perceived beliefs and values of the intended users that include consideration of social and environmental effects, to judge how well their ideas, plans, use of resources, actions and final results satisfy the specifications they developed.
  • Considers the values and beliefs held by developers and users and evaluates the appropriateness of technologies, including the impact on environment, efficiency of energy use, and cultural, ethical and gender implications.
  • Devises appropriate strategies to generate a range of designs that can be produced by others, including 2D and 3D representations, computer graphics, scale models (prototypes), discussions and written instructions.
  • Recognises the need for modification, giving well-argued justifications for their choice.
  • Uses technical terms and apply symbols and conventions appropriately.
  • Works cooperatively and independently, using their plans and giving attention to the constraints of timing, resource selection and availability and the appropriate delegation of tasks to peers.
  • Appraises all aspects of their activities critically, anticipating and overcoming problems.
  • Recognises potential hazards in the work environment and their work, and adopts safe work practices.
  • Evaluates critically the processes they have employed and the outcomes of their work.
  • Assesses the impact of their solutions on individuals, households, communities and associated environments.
  • Recognises the impact of technology on values relating to social, economic, cultural, political, religious, gender or environmental issues.
  • Describes how issues, values, needs and opportunities influence the design, production and use of technologies.
  • Devises, generates and tests ideas and prepares proposals that meet design specifications and criteria.
  • Communicates ideas using techniques appropriate to the purpose and audience, such as conferencing and diagrammatic representation.
  • Prepares design and production proposals that address functional, aesthetic, social and environmental issues.
  • Tests or examines products to determine expected quality standards.
  • Implements and controls production and adjusts their production processes to overcome difficulties and to achieve these specified standards of quality and efficient time, resource and energy use.
  • Continuously appraises products and processes against design criteria and similar products.
  • Considers the efficiency and effectiveness of their activities and associated ethics.

Technology and Enterprise: Information
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6
  • Recognises a variety of familiar ways of using and presenting information.
  • Gathers oral, print and graphical information from familiar sources such as family members, peers, books, signs, posters, CD-ROMs and television.
  • Suggests different ways of recording and presenting their ideas as information through oral means, text and simple images.
  • Considers the resources, techniques and the equipment that are needed to find, gather, record and present various familiar forms of information.
  • Uses a limited number of simple techniques to present information and reflect on how they feel about the use of information technologies and the resulting information solutions.
  • Uses a range of familiar information technologies safely and carefully to access, record and present information.
  • Describes common ways in which information is used, processed and transmitted, such as posters, pamphlets, books, product packages, road signs, photographs, tapes, digital disks and electronic files.
  • Investigates the form of such familiar information solutions, including the medium used and its shape, size and construction material, and recognises how design and production features are employed for particular audiences.
  • Examines their own and others’ reaction to different information technologies, and recognises that feelings such as excitement, mistrust, fear, lack of understanding, fascination, fun and confusion can influence an individual’s use of information technologies.
  • Recognises that the form and structure of information and information products can affect the meaning conveyed.
  • Reflects on the impact on their lives of common forms of information.
  • Presents, publishes and stores information in oral, textual and simple image forms such as electronic displays, static graphics, maps, photographs and recorded messages.
  • Specifies information required for a particular task and then finds, stores, sorts, analyses, manipulates and/or transforms it, often combining information from several sources.
  • Creates own information solutions, selecting the most appropriate medium for the particular audience in order to convey the intended ideas and purpose.
  • Reflects on the techniques they have applied, the practical constraints considered, the use to which it has been put and the skills they have demonstrated when using equipment and resources.
  • Judges the effectiveness of their completed product or process by comparing it with their original intention.
  • Describes the form of familiar and unfamiliar information solutions and identifies the purpose.
  • Describes how the form affects its use and people’s access to information.
  • Identifies the relationship between the form and content, and recognises how the solution has been designed and produced for particular audiences.
  • Explains different ways information is used, created, stored and transmitted and how this contributes to its purpose and meaning.
  • Examines people’s use of different information technologies and recognises that people do not make the same use of all information technologies and use different technologies for different purposes.
  • Selects and uses manual and digital techniques to create information solutions to meet a purpose.
  • Uses a range of techniques to access, record, store, manipulate and transmit information.
  • Considers what information is needed and how to present it in different ways to make it more accessible to others.
  • Plans the production by setting out the steps and identifies resources such as tools and materials.
  • Uses tools safely, correctly and efficiently.
  • Collects information to meet an identified need.
  • Stores the information logically, in a digital or hard-copy format, retrieving it as needed.
  • Judges the effectiveness of completed information solutions by considering whether it achieved its purpose.
  • Reflects on how the techniques applied contributed to the meaning, taking into account constraints such as availability of time, how they planned the process and the way they used manual and digital tools and equipment such as drawing tools and graphic organisers safely to create text, sketches and images for a particular purpose.
  • Describes the ways in which forms, styles and presentations of information can be used to create different effects and meanings.
  • Discriminates between various forms used for presenting information to suit a particular audience.
  • Identifies and discusses ways information can be presented and interpreted, noting bias, selection and emphasis in printed and non-printed texts.
  • Identifies examples of special effects that can enhance or modify the presentation and interpretation of information.
  • Combines a range of forms, including images, sound and text, to create information solutions that reflect a consideration of the needs of the target audience in terms of functional and, where applicable, aesthetic criteria.
  • Considers the social impacts of their solution, assessing the suitability of the information for the particular audience and whether the presentation is appropriate.
  • Uses a variety of sources to obtain information and, depending on the need, gather appropriate information that may include surveys, statistics, experimental results and interviews.
  • Records, sorts, interprets, transfers and transforms information, using various means such as graphics, tables, drawings, images and files.
  • Uses different forms, styles and presentations, adjusting techniques where necessary to create different effects for particular audiences and purposes.
  • Selects and operates appropriate information equipment safely and efficiently, using correct techniques.
  • Assesses how well design ideas, production processes and information solutions meet the needs of the particular audience.
  • Develops specific criteria from the design specifications to judge performance.
  • Describes specific forms, structures, styles and presentations used in particular information solutions.
  • Examines a variety of information solutions and identifies significant features of particular solutions.
  • Describes the way in which the meaning conveyed by information is influenced by its form, structure, style and presentation.
  • Investigates how the form influences the structure, style and presentation of the information, and how it has been modified for the audience.
  • Discusses the role and impact of information technologies on society.
  • Examines some ethical considerations about information, such as authenticity, access to data banks, copyright, plagiarism and credit card use.
  • Classifies particular forms of information solutions, such as advertisements, informational text, descriptive prose and formal correspondence, and determines the styles used in creating them.
  • Explores how technologies affect communities and environments, and makes judgements about their appropriateness using them as a basis for predicting future developments.
  • Creates information solutions using recognised methods, rules and languages.
  • Selects the most appropriate form, structure, style and presentation for the audience and the purpose.
  • Uses recognised procedures, commonly-understood rules and accepted practices to the processing of information and the creation of information solutions.
  • Records, sorts, interprets and transfers information by a variety of means, including files, spreadsheets, graphics, drawings, tables and reports.
  • Transforms or manipulates information to suit given purposes.
  • Monitors and maintains the information equipment they use.
  • Assesses the effectiveness of solutions in relation to design requirements and social and environmental criteria.
  • Describes the interrelationships among the variables relating to form, methods of transmission, standards and conventions and how these affect the use and impact of information.
  • Explains the ethical, social and economic issues involved in developing and applying information technology, relating these issues to everyday needs.
  • Considers the accuracy of information and the particular purpose it has been designed to achieve, determining, for example, whether it is current, from a reliable source, subject to bias, affected by translation or influenced by cultural factors.
  • Considers the consequences of using inaccurate and outdated information.
  • Describes the implications of new methods for managing information and compares them with processes used in the past.
  • Evaluates the efficiency of transmitting, receiving, storing and manipulating processes, and explains how the use of recognised conventions can enhance efficiency.
  • Explains how the storage of digital information can affect the privacy of individuals, families, communities or organisations.
  • Describes how the power of computers to search and retrieve at high speed facilitates the collation of small pieces of information.
  • Reflects on the security issues relating to the control and use of information.
  • Describes why freedom of information legislation was developed, how it is managed and individuals’ rights of access.
  • Interprets and makes judgements regarding ease of access, clarity, reliability and quality.
  • Describes the advantages of knowing the conventions for accessing and presenting information.
  • Evaluates the economic and social benefits, costs and impacts for individuals, small business, corporations and government associated with the use of one form of information over another, justifying the methods they would select.
  • Manipulates, transfers and creates information, using a wide range of information equipment.
  • Demonstrates initiative, flexibility, persistence and problem-solving skills in applying their understandings.
  • Devises or uses specialised ways of managing and handling information, and transfers information using electronic systems.
  • Compares their solutions with others from similar technologies, and applies ethical criteria when assessing effectiveness from a personal, local and global perspective.